Mental Well-Being

Staff are supported to learn about efforts they can take collectively and individually to positively impact their own mental well-being.  Ensuring a specific focus on mental well-being has shown to decrease stress, burnout and other negative factors (Cezar-Vaz et al., 2015).  Understanding and intentionally tending to a culture of mental well-being ultimately ensures healthy academic environments for all school community members (Gray, Wilcox, & Nordstokke, 2017). 

Key Domain - Mental Well-Being

Staff are supported to learn about efforts they can take collectively and individually to positively impact their own mental well-being.  Ensuring a specific focus on mental well-being has shown to decrease stress, burnout and other negative factors (Cezar-Vaz et al., 2015).  Understanding and intentionally tending to a culture of mental well-being ultimately ensures healthy academic environments for all school community members (Gray, Wilcox, & Nordstokke, 2017). 


Focus of the Domain

    • Advocacy for Mental Health - Awareness and promotion of mental health exists within the workplace but “is not the sole responsibility of an organization or its leaders” (Burns & Machin, 2013, p. 321).  Staff are aware of opportunities and are able to engage in professional and personal conversations and activities regarding mental health and mental health support within and outside of the school. Staff understand the value of self care in creating healthy balance in all aspects of life.
    • Strive for Balance - Staff engage in positive practices and self reflections that promote a balanced lifestyle.  Staff are aware of and able to identify and understand stress management strategies in order to cope effectively with stressful situations.  Staff understand and practice personal strategies that positively impact mental well-being in all aspects of life, which are shown to lead to higher levels of happiness at work (Benevene et al., 2019).

 

  • Awareness and Application -  Staff engage in continuous learning about mental health research and practice to increase their awareness and understanding of the impacts of mental well-being.  Staff apply this learning through self-reflection related to their personal mental well-being, to help build organizational resources and capacities that support and nurture staff morale and well-being (Wilson et al., 2004). 

Reflective Questions

  • How do I access and advocate for staff mental health support?
  • How do we, as a team, support each other for mental well-being?
  • What are my personal strategies that positively impact mental well-being in all aspects of life?
  • How do we, as a team, identify strategies and expectations which support people in maintaining a healthy balanced lifestyle?
  • How do I access information about mental health for myself and others?
  • How do we, as a team, engage in learning to promote healthy mental well-being?

 

References

Benevene P, De Stasio S, Fiorilli C, Buonomo I, Ragni B, Briegas JJM & Barni D (2019). Effect of teachers’ happiness on teachers’ health: The mediating role of happiness at work. Frontiers in Psychology, 10(2449).

Burns, R. A., & Machin, M. A. (2013). Employee and workplace well-being: A multi-level analysis of teacher personality and organizational climate in Norwegian teachers from rural, urban and city schools. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 57(3), 309-324.

Cezar-Vaz, M. R., Bonow, C. A., Almeida, M. C. V., Rocha, L. P., & Borges, A. M. (2015). Mental health of elementary schoolteachers in Southern Brazil: working conditions and health consequences. The Scientific World Journal, 1-5. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/825925

Gray, C., Wilcox, G., & Norstokke, D. (2017) Teacher mental health, school climate, inclusive education and student learning: A review. Canadian Psychology, 58(3), 203-210.

Wilson, M.G., Dejoy, D.M., Vandenberg, R.J., Richardson, H.A., & McGrath, A.L. (2004). Work characteristics and employee health and well-being: Test of a model of healthy work organization. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 77, 565– 588.

Social Well-Being

Staff engage and develop professional relationships to build a cohesive climate of trust, considered to be a foundation for school effectiveness (Huang, Yin & Lv, 2019).  Recognizing that social support has a powerful impact on overall well-being (Li & Zhang, 2019; Chi, Yeh & Wu, 2014), staff establish and maintain meaningful connections.

Key Domain - Social Well-Being

Staff engage and develop professional relationships to build a cohesive climate of trust, considered to be a foundation for school effectiveness (Huang, Yin & Lv, 2019).  Recognizing that social support has a powerful impact on overall well-being (Li & Zhang, 2019; Chi, Yeh & Wu, 2014), staff establish and maintain meaningful connections.

Focus of the Domain

  • Professionally Engaged Participant - Staff participate and contribute to a collaborative school culture, which positively impacts job satisfaction, staff enthusiasm and relationships with students (Edinger & Edinger, 2018). Staff seek out opportunities to engage with peers, through school-wide structures and processes that provide working conditions to support meaningful interactions.  Open communication between staff, administration, and division office is encouraged and supported.
  • Connections and Relationship Building - Staff develop positive connections and relationships within and outside of the school.  Opportunities exist in schools to establish and maintain these connections, creating a sense of community. When necessary, reaching out for assistance is encouraged and supported. 
  • Growth for Learning - Staff engage in ongoing reflection to enhance social well-being to cultivate a quality learning environment. Staff engage in collaborative professional learning that lead to high levels of self-efficacy and individual job satisfaction (Pogdzinski, 2013), as well as higher levels of shared professional capital (Hargreaves & Fullan, 2012).

 

Reflective Questions

 

  • How do I contribute and engage in a cohesive, respectful, and supportive environment? 
  • How do we, as a team, encourage and support positive professional engagement in our school?
  • How do I create and maintain healthy relationships? 
  • How do we, as a team, encourage and support positive connections and relationships for our team?
  • How do I positively contribute to collaborative professional learning?
  • How do we, as a team, support and enhance collaborative professional learning in our school?

 

 

References

Chi, H., Yeh, H., & W, S. F. (2014). How well-being mediates the relationship between social support and teaching effectiveness. Journal of Education and Learning, 3(4), 117-130.

Edinger, S. K. & Edinger, M. J. (2018). Improving teacher job satisfaction: The roles of social capital, teacher efficacy, and support. The Journal of Psychology, 152(8), 573-593. doi: 10.1080/00223980.2018.1489364

Hargreaves, A., & Fullan, M. (2012). Professional capital: transforming teaching in every school. New York: Teachers College Press.

Huang, S., Yin, H., & Yl, L. (2019). Job characteristics and teacher well-being: The mediation of teacher self-monitoring and teacher self-efficacy. Educational Psychology, 39(3), 313-331. doi: 10.1080/01443410.2018.1543855 

Li, Y. & Zhang, R. (2019). Kindergarten teachers’ work stress and work-related well-being: A moderated mediation model. Social Behavior and Personality, 47(11), e8409. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.8409

Pogodzinski, B. (2014). Collegial support and novice teachers’ perceptions of working conditions. Journal of Educational Change, 15(4), 467-489. doi: 10.1007/s10833-013-9221-x 

Physical Well-Being

All staff are supported to learn and engage in positive choices for physical well-being in a healthy environment.  A culture focused on physical well-being requires adaptive and flexible programs and opportunities, as well as supportive leadership, and has shown to have a positive impact on staff productivity, job satisfaction, stress management, morale, and a reduction in staff absenteeism and illness (Birdee et al., 2013; Herbert & Lohrmann, 2011).

Key Domain - Physical Well-Being

All staff are supported to learn and engage in positive choices for physical well-being in a healthy environment.  A culture focused on physical well-being requires adaptive and flexible programs and opportunities, as well as supportive leadership, and has shown to have a positive impact on staff productivity, job satisfaction, stress management, morale, and a reduction in staff absenteeism and illness (Birdee et al., 2013; Herbert & Lohrmann, 2011).

 

Focus of the Domain

  • Self-Care - Staff are aware of the connection between physical activity and mental health (Birdee et. al., 2013) and assume ownership of their own physical well-being. Regular physical activity (Barr-Anderson et al., 2011), nutrition and sleep are understood as important components (LeCheminant, Merrill, & Masterson, 2015).
  • Physical Environment -  Staff are cognizant of, and responsive to, opportunities and hazards the physical environment presents. Opportunities for creation and use of positive physical spaces to bolster self-care exist (Langley & Kulinna, 2018). Staff advocates for positive physical spaces by reporting hazards and/or concerns about the physical environment.  
  • Awareness, Application and Growth - Staff are supported to make healthy choices related to their physical well-being, with opportunities available for continued learning,  Collaboration occurs to share ideas and expertise. Staff are encouraged to make informed decisions about physical well-being.

 

Reflective Questions

 

  • How do I care for my physical well-being in all aspects of life?
  • How do we, as a team, support and celebrate everyones’ physical well-being in all aspects of life?
  • How do I ensure my environment is safe and conducive to optimal teaching and learning?.
  • How  do we, as a team, promote safe, physical spaces that are available for staff use?
  • How do I access and share opportunities to enhance physical well-being? 
  • How do we, as a team, grow our awareness of the importance of physical well-being?

 

References

Barr-Anderson, D. J., AuYoung, M., Whitt-Glover, M. C., Glenn, B. A., & Yancey, A. K. (2011). Integration of short bouts of physical activity into organizational routine: A systematic review of the literature. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 40(1), 76-93.

Birdee, G. S., Byrne, D. W., McGown, P. W., Rothman, R. L, Rolando, L. A., Holmes, M. C., & Yarbrough, M. I. (2013, May). Relationship between physical inactivity and health characteristics among participants in an employee-wellness program. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 55(5), 514-519.

Herbert, P. C., & Lohrmann, D. K. (2011, February). Leading by example: Health promotion programs for school staff. School Business Affairs, 77(2), 17-19. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ914698.pdf.

Langley, K., & Kulinna, P. (2018). Developing a staff physical activity program at your school: Implementing the lesser-used component of the CSPAP Model. Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 89(2), 49-55. doi: 10.1080/07303084.2017.1404509  

LeCheminant, J. D., Merrill, R. M., & Masterson, T. (2015). Health behaviours and work-related outcomes among school employees. American Journal of Health Behaviour, 39(3), 345-351.